Jack Kennedy: I’ve just confined myself to calling [Mr. Nixon] a Republican, but he says that’s getting low.

Jack Kennedy: I’ve just confined myself to calling [Mr. Nixon] a Republican, but he says that’s getting low.

admiralmpj:

It really wasn’t that long ago, folks.  This is why we vote.

admiralmpj:

It really wasn’t that long ago, folks.  This is why we vote.

granholmtwr:

42 vs. 24. More jobs created under Democratic presidents.

I suppose Jack Welch thinks we fixed these numbers, too. 

granholmtwr:

42 vs. 24. More jobs created under Democratic presidents.

I suppose Jack Welch thinks we fixed these numbers, too. 

collective-history:

Martin Luther King Jr removing a burned cross from his front yard with his son at his side. Atlanta Ga 1960.

This is why we vote. This is why we stand up for ourselves and make our voices heard.

collective-history:

Martin Luther King Jr removing a burned cross from his front yard with his son at his side. Atlanta Ga 1960.

This is why we vote. This is why we stand up for ourselves and make our voices heard.

oneluv918:

collective-history:

Firemen hose demonstrators in Kelly Ingram Park near 16th Street Baptist Church, Martin Luther King Jr’s headquarters for demonstration. Hosing was ordered by “Bull” Connor, the Birmingham Police Commissioner, 1963, by Bob Adelman

I will vote in honor of those who took a stand for my right to do so.

oneluv918:

collective-history:

Firemen hose demonstrators in Kelly Ingram Park near 16th Street Baptist Church, Martin Luther King Jr’s headquarters for demonstration. Hosing was ordered by “Bull” Connor, the Birmingham Police Commissioner, 1963, by Bob Adelman

I will vote in honor of those who took a stand for my right to do so.

blackpeopleproblems:

Rest In Peace, Emmett Louis Till.July 25, 1941-August 28, 1955

blackpeopleproblems:

Rest In Peace, Emmett Louis Till.
July 25, 1941-August 28, 1955

So, what exactly did Mitt Romney say last night?

Well, he threw out a lot of platitudes.

To say he was foggy on the details is an insult to fog.

And, of course, he left out his woeful job creation record when he was an actual Executive of a State.

When he ascended to the White House in 1929, many commentators expected that Hoover’s organizational acumen would make him a brilliant, practical leader. “We were in a mood for magic,” recalled one journalist about the start of his presidential term. “We summoned a great engineer to solve our problems for us; now we sat back comfortably and confidently to watch the problems being solved.”

But the onset of the Great Depression later that fall required the skills of a master politician, and Hoover, who had never run for office before, proved to be a less-than-mediocre one. A stiff and awkward speaker, he neither showed empathy for the jobless nor rallied Congress behind a credible plan to reverse the nation’s economic slide. Hoover’s stern belief in “rugged individualism” had helped win him riches and renown. But it prevented him from recognizing that Americans in trouble needed material relief instead of sermons about the evils of the dole and an unbalanced budget.

“The Great Humanitarian who had fed the starving Belgians in 1914, the Great Engineer so hopefully elevated to the presidency in 1928, now appeared as the Great Scrooge,” writes one historian. After a career spent commanding his own organizations, Hoover was unable to adjust to a job that required persuasion, adaptation, and compromise.

Michael Kazin of Dissent Magazine pointing out that when it comes to CEO Presidents, we’ve seen this movie before.